Learn Auslan – Pronouns

Learn Auslan pronouns. In Auslan, pronouns are not gender-specific. Mostly, they involve pointing at a person or object.

Vocab:

  • Me (use this for ‘I’ as well)
  • My
  • Mine
  • You
  • Your
  • Yours
  • You’re
  • Here
  • There
  • That/he/she/it (I show three examples of pointing.)

When using these words in conversation, point to the person or thing. If the person or thing is not there, invent a location for them them in space and make sure you continue to point to the same spot for the rest of the conversation.

You might notice that it can be pretty hard to understand sign language if you come in on a conversation in the middle. That’s because often a speaker will set up spaces and words at the beginning of a conversation, and then just do a lot of pointing to convey meaning after that.

Learn Auslan – Level 1 – Pronouns

Learn Auslan pronouns. In Auslan, pronouns are not gender-specific. Mostly, they involve pointing at a person or object.

Vocab:

• Me (use this for ‘I’ as well)
• My
• Mine
• You
• Your
• Yours
• You’re
• Here
• There
• That/he/she/it (I show three examples of pointing.)

When using these words in conversation, point to the person or thing. If the person or thing is not there, invent a location for them them in space and make sure you continue to point to the same spot for the rest of the conversation.

Journal Flip Through – Receive

I thought you might like to see this flip-through of one of my old journals.

I was studying art pretty intensely while I was working with this journal.  My practise paintings all landed in here, and I still love flipping back through it and seeing my progression as I learned new techniques.

Later in the book, my family and I went on a road trip. The pages are full of junk that I collected, little drawings of things we saw and did, and they capture the small moments of the days in nature.  I love a good travel journal, and I think my books are just the right size – big enough for a page a day, but small enough to carry around with you.  I go back and live my trips over and over again with this visual record.

If you’d like to learn how to make and use a book like mine, check out my e-course, Make The Book Of Your Dreams.

Learn Auslan – Level 1 – Deafness and sign language

Here are some signs about being deaf and using Auslan (Australian sign language):

Vocab:

  • Deaf
  • Hearing
  • Sign
  • Language
  • Auslan (Australian sign language)
  • Fingerspell/spell
  • Alphabet (A-Z)
  • Voice
  • Lock your voice/voice off
  • Oral (this is also the sign for lipread)

There are some words and phrases here that aren’t commonly used in mainstream English.

People who aren’t deaf are referred to as ‘hearing’. Deaf people who don’t use sign language, communicating with speech and lipreading, are described as ‘oral’. I grew up oral and learnt to sign when I was eighteen – this is a common situation for Deaf people in Australia.

Fingerspelling refers to manually spelling out the letters of words. If you don’t know the sign for a word, fingerspell it. In Auslan, fingerspelling is commonly used for names and places. Some words, such as ‘cream’ are always fingerspelled, and the fingerspelled version becomes a sort of ‘sign’ for that word. There are some English words for which there is no equivalent Auslan sign. In this case, you could fingerspell the word, though more fluent signers will usually find a way to visually convey the meaning of the word using Auslan signs.

Lock your voice: since Auslan has its own grammar, trying to speak English while signing can be challenging, and also make your signs difficult to understand. It’s common in Auslan to refer to ‘turning off your voice’ or ‘locking your voice’ which means that you don’t speak – just sign. However, if you are speaking English with a group of hearing people, and there is a Deaf person present, it is polite to sign whatever words you can, even if it’s not using correct Auslan grammar, so that the Deaf person can get an idea of what you are talking about.

Learn Auslan – Deafness and sign language

Here are some signs about being deaf and using Auslan (Australian sign language):

Vocab:

  • Deaf
  • Hearing
  • Sign
  • Language
  • Auslan (Australian sign language)
  • Fingerspell/spell
  • Alphabet (A-Z)
  • Voice
  • Lock your voice/voice off
  • Oral (this is also the sign for lipread)

There are some words and phrases here that aren’t commonly used in mainstream English.

People who aren’t deaf are referred to as ‘hearing’. Deaf people who don’t use sign language, communicating with speech and lipreading, are described as ‘oral’. I grew up oral and learnt to sign when I was eighteen – this is a common situation for Deaf people in Australia.

Fingerspelling refers to manually spelling out the letters of words. If you don’t know the sign for a word, fingerspell it. In Auslan, fingerspelling is commonly used for names and places. Some words, such as ‘cream’ are always fingerspelled, and the fingerspelled version becomes a sort of ‘sign’ for that word. There are some English words for which there is no equivalent Auslan sign. In this case, you could fingerspell the word, though more fluent signers will usually find a way to visually convey the meaning of the word using Auslan signs.

Lock your voice: since Auslan has its own grammar, trying to speak English while signing can be challenging, and also make your signs difficult to understand. It’s common in Auslan to refer to ‘turning off your voice’ or ‘locking your voice’ which means that you don’t speak – just sign. However, if you are speaking English with a group of hearing people, and there is a Deaf person present, it is polite to sign whatever words you can, even if it’s not using correct Auslan grammar, so that the Deaf person can get an idea of what you are talking about.